The Art of Collaboration

The first time I collaborated with someone on writing a song together was about a month and a half into my songwriting journey, just over a year ago.

It was such a nerve-wrecking idea that I would be adding my own creation to someone’s else’s creation in the hopes of making it bigger and better!

Well, I have to say that partnering up with Adam Boddy was just about the best introduction I could have asked for to the art of collaborating.  He was incredibly responsive, encouraging, and honest.  And we both just happened to be on the same page about a lot of things!

It doesn’t always come that easy though.

Some of you have heard our song “For Simone” before but I’m putting it up now as I’m currently into a new collaboration and needing to find some inspiration somewhere!  Anywhere!

I guess it’s this way with anything in life — sometimes you have to work with people who maybe don’t do things the way you normally do.  And you’re given a challenging task to do and could use all the encouragement and feedback that you can get … but you don’t always get it.

We can always learn something from the experience though and use it to better our half of being a collaborative partner.  Always a silver lining to everything!

Have you ever had a challenging collaboration you found your way through?

~ Cafe

Music Therapy

music notes head

To me, it’s a no-brainer that music has always had the power to help people heal.

There’s so many pent up thoughts and emotions in people’s heads these days.  So many things we don’t feel comfortable saying or expressing because we’re afraid of how others might see us.

Music — whether we’re taking it in or the ones letting it out — takes the place of having to say the words we often feel can’t justify our experiences anyway.

Taking it to another level, music has even been used to treat certain diseases or disorders with its therapeutic benefits for people with Alzheimer’s, addiction, and depression.

For example, music therapy is said to “increase motivation for treatment in patients with substance-abuse disorders, improve decision-making skills and help prevent relapse.”

This might be done through certain music exercises that strengthen the part of the brain involved in decision-making, or by participating in a drumming circle as an alternative to verbal therapy.

Songwriting is also a way to help people process certain feelings — as is probably a lot of other art forms.  Of course, I can really relate to this.  Even if the song isn’t about my life, getting to channel certain emotions through my songwriting and singing can really be cathartic.

Life often seems to be a journey to freeing ourselves from our own minds.  If music can help you to get there, why not lean on it?!

So, has music helped YOU to heal?  And how?

~ Cafe