The Hardest Thing I’ve Ever Done

**This post was Freshly Pressed! Thanks to WordPress and to everyone who read, liked, and commented! Much love!

This epic adventure of our four young heroes begins on a gloomy, overcast morning.
The fifth of their band had fallen from the ranks.
Even Charlie, the Australian Shepherd, was to deny them his companionship on the long journey ahead.

Alas, the four heroes would march forth, a united army,
Into what was foretold to be days of thunderous storms and merciless showers.

Survival comes at a price, weighing heavily on their backs.
Our heroes enter the dark forests of Killarney,
Like knights forging into the abyss of battle.
How will they persevere for nine days when the first hour begs for relief?

The constant, piercing pain in their shoulders was unprepared for;
Every footstep on the uneven, rocky path becomes akin to lifting lead.
Did our heroes expect too much?
Delude themselves into believing that they were worthy of winning this war?

There is a momentary reprieve in the sojourn
As our band of ravenous travellers stop to refuel.
Chief’s succulent veal roast is devoured like The Last Supper.
A mountain of fluffy white rice nurses the mind’s wounds back to health.

Merry as elves, stomachs content with the feast,
Our heroes take up their pilgrimage once more.
Yet, what is said to take one hour extends into two for our weary crew.
Then, the first of them is hit.

Big J’s knee, giving way to the unforgiving terrain, waves the white flag.
Agony stretched across her face,
She attempts bravery in the midst of falling arrows,
Her comrades patch her up and again, they roar on.

Finally, as the merciful mirage appears to the worn desert travellers,
The sign to their first night’s home beckons.
After a few wrong turns and balancing perilously on narrow ridges,
Our exhausted heroes stumble into an oasis.

The fight is not over; it has only begun.
They know the worst awaits them in the mountains,
Like the sleeping dragon that will surely awake when neared.
Will our heroes survive and slay the beast?

Stay tuned …

What’s the hardest thing you’ve ever done (physically and/or mentally)? Why was it the “hardest thing”?

* * *

What’s up?! Okay, for those of you who are like, What has happened to Cafe and why is she talking like Shakespeare??? I thought that writing about my hiking trip adventures in the style of this week’s Writing Challenge by The Daily Post would be so much fun! I really did feel like this was an epic tale and seriously the hardest thing I’ve ever done, at least physically (but mentally, it was up there too!)

So I hope you enjoyed it and if you want to hear about the rest of the trip in this epic prose (hehe), holla in the comment box!

– Cafe <3

161 thoughts on “The Hardest Thing I’ve Ever Done

  1. Pingback: Coffee, Blogging & Skydiving: An Interview with Cafe from Your Daily Dose! | rohan7things

  2. Pingback: The Hardest Thing I’ve Ever Done (Conclusion) | Your Daily Dose

  3. Congrats for being Freshly Pressed Janice! You deserved it :) I love the warning sign or maybe a goodluck sign for the hikers!

  4. I absolutely love that day hiker sign at the beginning. “Warning, Day Hiker: You Will Die.” Nice work, by the way! Now that is what I call a tedious slog. Why must we torture ourselves?

    • LOL! Seriously. Such an enthusiastic beginning =P

      Why DO we torture ourselves? I don’t know but I already wish I could be back there or somewhere in nature :)

  5. Wow! Congrats!
    Awesome story so far and looking forward to the rest!
    Great pics too!

    The toughest thing I’ve ever done has probably been returning from one of these kinds of trips.
    As tough as they are, I always wish I could stay out just a little longer.

    Veal and rice, huh?
    Sounds like you found those recipes you were looking for. :)

    • Thanks Joe!
      Actually the veal was a total surprise! A very pleasant surprise, I might add :D
      I know what you mean, I started getting pretty sad the last couple of days, thinking about how we’d be leaving soon. Although I can’t lie, I enjoyed that hot shower and soft bed immensely upon my return! But I’m totally itching to be back out there again already!

  6. Spending time around nature… ahh I love hiking!
    The hardest thing I’ve ever done? Well I’ve just accomplished it: to say out loud to that Special Someone, “I love you.” Omg it was so hard! But I did it :)

      • Went well :) Doesn’t mean that we’re going out together, not yet at least because we’re both just so new to this, but I feel great! I believe this will be the start of something good!

  7. Wow Janice! What an adventure and what a post! I think you must be definitely getting a lot fitter – that journey looked like hard work! I’ve not been around for a while but made sure to look out for your blog now I’m back. Hope the training is going well too!! :)

    • Haha, thanks Pete! I got fit from the trip and then … I’ve done nothing since I got back =P
      I’m hoping to go for a run today though!
      Thanks for lookin’ out for me, I know it’s been busy times for everyone these days including myself! Hope all is well :)

      • Great photos of Killarney trails. Have you been to Killarney Provincial Park in winter? Absolutely magical. Better yet, you can rent one of the park’s heated yurts which have electricity too. They’re pretty cozy. Sometimes you can even hear the Killarney wolf packs howl at night.

        • No, I have not been there in the winter! And I did not know you could rent a heated yurt there. Wow. So do you sleep in the yurt at the campgrounds and go for a hike during the day?

  8. Hi, Its great that you are doing such an amazing challenge!
    I am climbing Mount Kilimanjaro in July for the Meningitis Research Foundation, and I am quite worried and unsure of how to train! How did you train to do your hike? Any tips?

    Thank you :-)

    • Hey Kathleen! Thanks so much :)

      Wow, Mt. Kilimanjaro sounds amazing! Well, I have to admit that I didn’t do a crazy amount of training, or a specific kind of training for this hike (mostly because I didn’t have the time right before I went). But for sure, you need to have some strong quads, hamstrings and butt for steep ups and downs — so working out those body parts would help (not that you should neglect everything else)! I also found that having two hiking poles was clutch, it really helps to propel you forward and takes the strain off of your knees and legs! And luckily, someone had brought a wrap that I could use for my knee, which was already kinda prone to injury beforehand. That helped a ton, because this hiking trip was really hard on the knees and I imagine yours might be too!

      I think having been on many backcountry camping trips before, I was at least mentally prepared for certain things like getting rained on, having to keep going when you are physically exhausted, being out there for over a week with no comforts of home, etc. Being able to deal with those kinds of things, especially on a mental level, I think are just as important for getting through a multiple-day hike as is being physically prepared.

      You will also probably want to learn how to pack as lightly as possible, as having a heavy pack will make the trek even more difficult! Also learning how to adjust it properly when you have it on you can make a huge difference in how comfortable you feel when hiking. I hope you are going with some experienced people who can help you with these kinds of things along the way! :)

      I would definitely check out some other blogs of people who have done these types of mountain climbing, as I haven’t done anything super high before (if you look through this comments list, you’ll see some people mentioning the climbs they did). There was also some tips about dealing with being in high elevation in the comment section here: http://yourdailydoseblog.com/2012/09/07/my-sacred-map-of-adventures-weekly-writing-challenge-daily-post-wordpress/

      I wish you the best of luck and would love to know how it goes!

    • Btw, I asked another reader for some tips and he passed on something he found that might be helpful to you:

      “High-altitude climbing clubs—citing safe ascent rate suggestions offered by organisations such as the Royal Geographical Society—have criticised the Tanzanian authorities for charging fees for each day spent on the mountain. It was once argued that this fee structure encouraged trekkers to climb rapidly to save time and money, while proper acclimatisation demands that delays are built in to any high climb. However, in response to this accusation, Tanzania National Parks Authority several years ago mandated minimum climb durations for each route. These regulations prohibit climbs of fewer than five days on the Marangu Route, and ensure a minimum of six days for the other five sanctioned routes. These minimums—particularly in the case of Marangu, which ostensibly allows that Uhuru Peak (5,895m) can be reached from a starting elevation at 1,860m within 72 hours of beginning the ascent—are reckoned by most alpinists to allow an ascent rate that will usually result in the climber failing to acclimatize adequately, by the time that Kibo Huts are reached; the launch base from which the summit is assaulted. Consequently, the incidence of Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) is widely deemed to be unacceptably high on Kilimanjaro, with high volumes of fit young people succumbing to the condition, having opted for a relatively rapid ascent. As a general rule, it is far safer (and more enjoyable) to avoid altitude sickness by planning a sensible itinerary that allows for gradual acclimatisation to high elevation as one ascends. Operations that typically see in excess of a thousand climbers summitting annually and are best placed to identify such patterns, usually posit that an optimal climb length should last around seven to eight days.”

    • Thanks, Valentine! Haha, yeah, it’s funny that I’m writing of such torture and agony but then I’m smiling in most of the photos lol. Trust me, there was lots of expressions of pain as well =P

    • Thanks, Andreas!
      And great trip you had there along the Wall! It really is a mental challenge, especially when you see more of those damn hills in the distance lol. Whenever I see solo trekkers, I have great admiration and wonder if it’s ever hard to deal with the solitude? I’m sure it definitely has its great moments, but I wonder if it ever gets tough out there being on your own for so long?

      • Very good question! I was actually surprised that the loneliness was no problem. I had taken an MP3 player full of interesting podcasts and I only used it once on a long stretch along a busy road. But when I walked through nature, I was fine with being alone with my thoughts and the impressions.

        • That’s awesome. It’s one thing I’m still not sure that I could do, even though I’m very comfortable being just with myself at times. I think what would worry me the most, actually, is whether I’ll be safe by myself and what I’d do if I got an injury or something. But it sounds like the trail you were on wasn’t too remote and civilization was never too far away?

          • The trail was actually quite far from civilization at times, but because the Hadrian’s Wall Path is one of the official long distance paths in Britain, there are plenty of other hikers. So if something happens, it wouldn’t take long until somebody comes by and will be able to (get) help.

            • That’s good. I think if I were to do a solo hike, I’d make sure the route was like that.
              Thanks for the info, Andreas!

            • Good call! We ran into a hiker this trip who had some flares and thought it’d be a good idea to have too! Thanks :)

  9. Kudos for the successful hike!

    Well, the hardest thing I have ever done is the same as you. I have my fair share of the mountains and I could say aiming for the mountain’s summit is really, really hard. It will require one to be physically and mentally fit as the mountain trails present different kinds of challenges. Challenges that will require extraordinary strength especially for beginners.

    One thing I can say is that, one cannot contest that until he can and he will “slay” even just one “beast” too.

    Cheers.

    • Thanks! Kudos to you as well! :)
      Yes, I’ve chatted with some bloggers about this. These mountain trails sound like they’re on a whole other level. I think I would definitely find it scary, but I’m sure the reward of slaying the beast is so worth it :)

  10. Wow!! I applaud you for doing this! Today, I too did the hardest thing I’ve ever done. I did a mud run/obstacle course. I feel like I want to die but am so proud of myself for doing it. Great job and beautiful pictures.

    • Hey mdog32! Thanks so much! Well, I know those mud run/obstacle courses are TOUGH as nails, so I definitely give you props for getting through that successfully! :)

  11. Oh Janice, what wonderful, wonderful travels. I loved that red plate piled high with rice – and of course all your smiles all the pics. Loved the way you wrote it to – your opening sentence had grab :)

    • Thanks Noeleen! Always a pleasure to see your beautiful self in my neck of the woods :) Sorry I’ve been absent from your and many others’ blogs as of late. I’m hoping that things will settle down soon in life and I can return to your wonderful story. How is your writing going?

      And yeah, this did get FP’d! Craziness! Was so very pleasantly surprised :)

      • You never know who’s watching…. I think it’s a worthy FP – just great.

        My writing’s going okay. I’ve over the block that stood in my path, & moving forward.
        Only do what you can in the blogosphere when you’ve time or will to, I say, for present life must be attended to first.

        Cheers :)

        • Thank you, you always say the nicest things! :)

          Glad to hear you’ve jumped over the hurdle! Keep up the great writing, Noeleen, you have a true gift. Talk to you soon! :)

  12. Yay! So happy to see you Freshly Pressed! Looking forward to hearing more about this hike, because it sounds f**king crazy to me. Anyways, congrats again Janice. Air high five coming your way! : )

  13. Enjoyed your post. What an adventure! My knees will not allow me such a trip, sadly.
    Congrats on being FPd! Enjoy the ride!

    • Thanks Someone! =P
      It’s been a fun ride so far :)
      My knees were pretty questionnable too on this trip. I’m gonna have to go for a run soon and see what condition they’re in :S

  14. You continue to conquer and navigate known and unknown places of interest and difficulty.Keep going and dont surrender just like you did here…why not try this place called Oman…there will be more exciting places here conquering the jebels and the wadis…

  15. Reblogged this on Lloyd Lofthouse and commented:
    I love hiking. My biggest challenges (for hiking) have been the week long hikes in the High Sierras (including the back country of Yosemite) sometimes reaching higher than 11,000 feet near the John Muir Trail. Heavy backpacks weighing as sixty pounds are a burden when climbing for miles with thousands of feet of elevation gain but when the pack comes off, you feel like you are on the moon and can fly.

    Your fantastic photos brought all the memories back. Alas, I haven’t been on one of those memorable hikes since two of my hiking buddies died a few years back—both from different types of cancer. We had some great times in the high country slogging through hip deep snow at eleven thousand feet or sitting around campfires late at night swapping dirty jokes and laughing.

    • Hey Lloyd! Thanks so much for the re-blog and your great comment.
      I’m so sorry for the loss of your hiking friends. I hope you always treasure these great memories of the adventures and laughter you shared with them.
      Sounds like you’ve been on some crazy exciting trips! Did you have trouble adjusting to the high elevation?

      • “Did you have trouble adjusting to the high elevation?”

        Slowly, a step at a time. As you near ten thousand feet, you take ten steps, then stop to let your hammering heart slow down before taking the next ten steps. At the top, you let the view impress your heart and soul and say thank you.

        This may sound surprising, but even in the San Gabriel mountains that rim Los Angeles, there are at least two if not more hikes worth taking. The tallest peak in the San Gabriel Mountains is Mt. San Antonio at 10,068 ft. The best way to the top is through the Mt. Baldy Ski area and across what is known as the Devil’s Backbone–a narrow trail with several thousand foot slopes dropping away on each side. I’ve heard that when the wind is fierce people are known to get down and crawl on all fours for fear that they will be blown off the trail. I’ve been across that trail a dozen or more times and never faced that windy threat. But still, there are a few locations on that trail where you feel as if you are a bug clinging to the side of a cliff the trail is so narrow.

        The view is WOW!

        Then there is Mt. Baden Powell on the eastern flank of the San Gabriel Mountains. The hike to the top of Baden Powell (at 9,407 feet) is my favorite. From the parking lot, it is eight miles round trip with a 2,800-foot elevation gain and on the way you will see a tree that is older than Jesus Christ. I believe it is a Yellow Pine. At the top, you look east across the Mohave Desert and see the Sierra Nevada Mountains usually rimmed in clouds. In the winter, you may be hiking in snow from the parking lot to the top of the peak surrounded by a forest and through the forest you keep looking out over the painted desert. Breathtaking time TEN.

        Then there is the Three T’s in the San Gabriel Mountains. If you start before the sun rises, you may finish that hike as the sun sets. You start out from Icehouse Canyon to reach Timber (8,303 ft.), Telegraph (8,985 ft.) and Thunder (8,587 ft.) Mountains. On that hike I have been face to face with a black bear, a Big Horn sheep (does not look like any sheep I’ve ever seen) and a huge rattle snake that was in a hurry to escape our hiking group.

        • Omg I would DIE on Devil’s Backbone. I mean die of terror. I am not good with heights. I do not wish to be crawling along a narrow ledge with a sheer drop calling my name next to me :S

          Is Baden Powell oer the Three T’s a little more friendly? Eh heh.

          I hope one day though that I get to do one of these climbs. I’m sure the view wouyld be totally unreal, nothing I’ve seen before. Just gotta choose one that doesn’t involve the risk of falling to my demise! :)

          • The trails leading to the top of Baden Powell and the three T’s are much safer than the Devil’s Backbone route to the top of Mt. San Antonio (known as Mt. Baldy) but do not go in winter after the snow falls. After a storm, snow and ice cover the trails and some of it is black ice–not something to be walking on even on wider, safer trails.

            However, I must say this: hiking up to the three T’s with blue skies right after a blizzard is incredible. The trees, the ground, the mountains are all blanketed in thick, pure white fresh snow. On one trip with a party of more than a dozen (three of us were teachers and the rest were some of our high school students that were members of the campus environmental club), we were the first up the trail after the storm. We couldn’t even see the trail but one of the forest rangers was on his way up to check on some campers that went in before the storm hit so he led the way. Without the ranger, it would have been easy to get lost in the forest and leave the trail.

            It turned out that the campers had pitched their tent and spent three days mostly in their below zero sleeping bags so they were okay. They had survived the storm with no health threats.

            On another trip with Marshall (now gone due to leukemia), we took the alternate route to the top of Mt. San Antonio. This route is much safer avoiding the Devil’s Backbone (there are three ways to reach the top of this mountain–I’ve only used two of them because we heard the third is more dangerous than the DB) and this route goes past a waterfall but it is longer with more elevation gain than the route across the DB.

            Taking the safest route, you will reach the Sierra Club’s ski hut (usually locked but with great tasting drinkable spring water flowing from a pipe outside the hut). From there you cross a field of massive boulders that fell from the mountain in the past. Then you start some serious climbing on a steep slope. When it snows this stretch is very dangerous because after the storm, the snow in the shade stays rock hard and is slick while the snow in the sun is slushy. Coming down, on this stretch, Marshall decided to take a short cut across a shady section and he slipped and almost slid off a cliff with a drop of thousands of feet. I stayed in the sun on the slushy snow higher up and did not lose my balance.

            Marshall managed to guide himself into a bush and stopped his slide or he would have gone over. I could do nothing but watch and imagined that I would have to break the news to his wife and children. I’m so glad that bush was there.

            After that stretch, the trail is safer even in snow but not during a storm. That day, we attempted to reach the top in a storm and it was freezing. The wind was fierce and the ground was covered with snow. The dark cloudy sky above us was spinning like a blender and we were at the bottom of it.

            Before we reached a top, a single woman coming down warned us that the wind was too fierce near the top. The wind had picked her up off her feet and carried her across the slope at least a hundred feet as if she were a leaf. She lost her knitted cap and one of her gloves–the wind tore them off. She said she was at least a 100 yards from the top when she turned back.

            Needless to say, Marshall and I turned back and his sliding adventure on the hard, crusty ice happened on the way down to the field of giant boulders.

            There is another mountain called Cucamonga Peak (8,862 ft). You reach it on the same trail that leads from Ice House Canyon to the three T’s. This peak is on the Western edge of the San Gabriel Mountains and from the top you can look east, south and north and see what looks like endless mountains and looking west, you see the Los Angeles Basin and the San Gabriel Valley with the city, the freeways and airports spread out below you. On a clear day you can see all the way to the Pacific Ocean and the islands off of Southern California such as Catalina.

            • OMG! Was Marshall traumatized after that near disaster???

              Wow, I’m surprised that high school students went on the trek during winter! That must have been an awesome school trip though! =P

              Thanks for sharing your stories. Now THOSE are some epic adventures!!

              Btw, there is a reader, Kathleen, who left one of the more recent comments on this post. She is going to be climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro in July and asked me for some training tips. I don’t have any tips specific to climbing high mountains, but I thought of you and wondered if you could maybe help her out with a little bit of advice on how to prepare?

              Thanks again, Lloyd! :)

            • Kilimanjaro is much higher than anything I’ve done. It’s 19,341 feet above sea level. However, I found the following that might help:

              “High-altitude climbing clubs—citing safe ascent rate suggestions offered by organisations such as the Royal Geographical Society—have criticised the Tanzanian authorities for charging fees for each day spent on the mountain. It was once argued that this fee structure encouraged trekkers to climb rapidly to save time and money, while proper acclimatisation demands that delays are built in to any high climb. However, in response to this accusation, Tanzania National Parks Authority several years ago mandated minimum climb durations for each route. These regulations prohibit climbs of fewer than five days on the Marangu Route, and ensure a minimum of six days for the other five sanctioned routes. These minimums—particularly in the case of Marangu, which ostensibly allows that Uhuru Peak (5,895m) can be reached from a starting elevation at 1,860m within 72 hours of beginning the ascent—are reckoned by most alpinists to allow an ascent rate that will usually result in the climber failing to acclimatize adequately, by the time that Kibo Huts are reached; the launch base from which the summit is assaulted. Consequently, the incidence of Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) is widely deemed to be unacceptably high on Kilimanjaro, with high volumes of fit young people succumbing to the condition, having opted for a relatively rapid ascent. As a general rule, it is far safer (and more enjoyable) to avoid altitude sickness by planning a sensible itinerary that allows for gradual acclimatisation to high elevation as one ascends. Operations that typically see in excess of a thousand climbers summitting annually and are best placed to identify such patterns, usually posit that an optimal climb length should last around seven to eight days.”

    • Fun … yes. Sort of. Haha. It was very challenging and rewarding. And looking back at the trip, I definitely feel like it was fun! Thanks for enjoying the post and photos :)

  16. The value of my comment just went way down. After all these trip blogs and things about hiking you finally try something new and it gets you popular. There’s a lesson to be learned.

    Congrats on the FP!

  17. That’s a cool trip. Im hoping I get to go on one of these too. Someday.

    But, I love the Shakespeare-like-talking. Thank you for making me realise I’m not the only one. :)

    • Heya baaxess! Thanks, the Shakespearean take was fun to do :)
      I hope you also get to do something awesome like this. Start off slow and build up to it if you’ve never done backcountry camping yet. The shock will be less jarring that way =)

    • Heya, thanks! Well, this was still pretty early on in the game so the thought of giving up hadn’t crossed our minds yet. But by the beginning of day 3, we had to decide whether to turn back or not …

  18. I love hiking, but I’ve never done this kind of real hiking. I can barely hold up under the weight of my school backpack, let alone days of walking with that seemingly hundred-pound sack! It looks like it’s well worth the effort though!

    • Hi Jane! Haha, well, you’d be surprised at what you can do when put in the situation. Mentally, this was hard because you knew you had to get from point A to point B, even though all you wanted to do was throw the damn pack off and just curl into a ball on the ground lol. But if you do get through it, it totally makes you feel like you are invincible! :)

    • Hi ghostbusterbev!! I’m totally loving your blogging name!! :)
      Awesome, is this going to be a day hiking trip or are you staying overnight there? Have you been to Charleston Lake before?

    • Thanks, Angelia! Well, no one — including myself — could imagine how hard it was. Trust me, it was a shocker when I found out! Haha. But yeah, such great memories! :)

  19. Good stuff! Congrats on breaking your mental barrier.
    Hardest thing you’ve ever done, that simply sets a new bench mark.

    Anything more than 4-5 days is pretty hardcore! Did you guys complete the 78km loop?
    I’m from Australia, not sure about that loop you did. How did you go about with fresh water?

    • Thanks, Eugene! That’s right, this will simply be ammunition for the next challenge up ahead :)

      Ah, you’ll have to stay tuned for part 2 to find out whether we completed the loop or not, hehe ;)

      We bring along water purification drops that kill the bacteria in the water. We also had a water filter pump, but that can be quite time consuming to pump a large volume of water. Better for just doing individual bottles once in awhile.

      Any good hiking trails in Australia that you’ve tried? :)

      • Nah….. Sure you did not! 78km is mental torture! Furthest I’ve done is 70ish – 80kms in Thailand over 3 days, and that was because I had to and it was over open terrain!

        Good effort!

        Will check back for sure. And the rice got me baffled. =O

        Yes! Started hiking not too long ago, done a few routes, a couple in the infamous Blue Mountains region. Best I’ve done so far. Haven’t written up the posts, but check the rest out anyway!

        http://ismelladventure.wordpress.com

        • Haha! Do you really think I didn’t? =P

          Why did you have to do the 70-80 km hike? Is the Blue Mountains region in Thailand as well?

          Some very beautiful scenery on your hike! :)

          • Well get your next article up and we’ll find out!
            Very nice looking hike there. I’d love to do something like that here in Australia, just too many hills and mountains around.

            Did the long hike during a navigation exercise while I was still serving. Got thrown in an unmarked area and had to navigate the distance with a compass a huge topographic map of the area. Great fun!(without the load)

            Nah, Blue Mountains is in Sydney, Australia

            http://www.visitnsw.com/destinations/blue-mountains/lithgow-area?gclid=CO_O-fO_8rICFUEa6wod4CQAXw

            • Haha! Okay, the conclusion is soon to come, after another post tomorrow on what makes a blog a good blog! :)

              Whoa, getting thrown into something like that sounds like a real challenge! I bet I’d have a blast doing that though!

    • Thanks, Constance! It was the first strictly hiking trip I’ve been on (although I’ve been on many backcountry camping trips), so quite a new and exciting adventure! :)

  20. Cool pics! This reminds me of a hike I once attempted in Alberta…it was a several hours day hike. At times I wanted to quit on the way up. It was steep, wet and snowy all in one and the altitude was pretty high. I’m glad I completed it because the view at the top was spectacular. I can’t imagine how challenging your adventure must be, but I’m sure it’s definitely worth it. Best of luck and congrats on being FP! :)

    • Thanks so much! Yeah, that sounds like our hike (minus the snow) on most days! But yeah, the view was so worth it. Once it appeared, it was like: ahhh, this is why we do these crazy things we do :)

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